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They are not. The only reason these self-regulating safer alternative reactors are not the ones in service are because they do not result in weapons grade plutonium.

Martin explains that Weinberg's unwillingness to sacrifice potentially safe nuclear power for the benefit of military uses forced him to retire:
Weinberg realized that you could use thorium in an entirely new kind of reactor, one that would have zero risk of meltdown. ... his team built a working reactor .... and he spent the rest of his 18-year tenure trying to make thorium the heart of the nation’s atomic power effort. He failed. Uranium reactors had already been established, and Hyman Rickover, de facto head of the US nuclear program, wanted the plutonium from uranium-powered nuclear plants to make bombs. Increasingly shunted aside, Weinberg was finally forced out in 1973.

yeah. just watched this earlier. yup, they've been around for a while, various types. less demand for them by those wanting to make nukes tho. or so i presume(/had implied to me) is the reason we've not been having them.

The only reason these self-regulating safer alternative reactors are not the ones in service are because they do not result in weapons grade plutonium.
Do nuclear reactors produce enriched uranium/plutonium? I thought the issue was that the infrastructure to refine uranium for power could be used to refine it even further for bombs, not that the plants themselves actually produce refined material.

You are correct, my wording was poor

Well, sort of. You can make nuclear bombs from U-235, but we haven't done so for sixty years. We use plutonium — and weapons-grade plutonium is ONLY produced in significant quantities in uranium-fueled reactors. The supply of naturally-occurring U-235 is inadequate, which is why we switched to plutonium in the first place. (Also, plutonum is in certain respects easier to design a modern nuclear weapon around.)

Technically a thorium-cycle reactor does produce an isotope (uranium-232) that could be used to make nuclear weapons, but it's not really useful because there is no feasible way to separate it out from the rest of the fuel, and in any case several of its decay products emit hard gamma radiation that will damage any nearby electronics.